We all know the “C” word well—cancer. It’s an unpredictable, terrible disease that we hope we never have to get to know well. But there’s always something you can do. Did you know there are certain lifestyle changes you can make now that help reduce your risk of getting cancer? Read on for our list of six ways you can become healthier and possibly dodge the disease:

 

 1. Stay Up to Date with Cancer Screens

Getting regular cancer screening tests done can not only help you spot out cancer early, but it could also possibly save your life. Isn’t that reason enough to call your doctor, and get them scheduled?

 

2. Stabilize a Healthy Weight

Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for many cancers, including breast, colon, endometrium, kidney, esophagus and pancreatic cancer. Yikes! Scary to think about, isn’t it? That’s why it’s so important to get to a healthy weight (if you’re not already at one).

 

3. Fit Exercise into Your Weekly Routines

One of the easiest ways that’s been proven to lower your risk of getting cancer is to add physical activity to your life. If you don’t do so already, make sure to add 150 minutes of exercise into your week. (This could even be as simple as taking brisk walks.)

 

4. Eat a Well-Balanced, Healthy Diet

The American Cancer Society recommends eating at least 2.5 cups of fruits and vegetables a day, eating less red meat and processed meat and choosing breads, pastas and cereals made from whole grains. They also highly recommend staying away from sugar—especially white sugar.

 

5. Steer Clear from Tobacco

This one is big. We’re serious—about 30% of all cancer deaths are caused by tobacco use, which we can’t speak for you, but that terrifies us. If you already use tobacco products, quitting would be the best idea.  

 

6. Put Limits on How Much Alcohol You Consume

Yeah, it’s true, alcohol has been linked to cancer—especially if you’re an avid binge drinker. Stick by this rule to reduce your risk of cancer: men should have no more than two drinks a day, while women should keep it to only one drink a day.  

 


Source: By Stacy Simon – American Cancer Society website - Article date: January 16, 2015