Berry Smoothie

 

Along with a regular exercise routine, food and water play a big part in living a healthy life. Whether you’re just going for a slow walk or training for a marathon, your eating habits can determine how you feel. Eating and drinking before a workout is very important. If you don’t eat or drink beforehand, you could risk feeling lightheaded, dehydrated, and possibly fainting. If you eat and drink too much, you could develop a stomach ache or nauseous feeling.

Size definitely matters; if you’re going to have a large meal, wait at least 3 to 4 hours before working out. If you are having a snack, wait 2 to 3 hours before working out. The same goes for water; Drink 2 to 3 cups of water before you work out. During your workout, take small sips of water to add up to 1 cup every 15 minutes.

The type of food you eat matters too. Look for food that has whole-grains and a healthy amount of protein and carbohydrates. Examples of good pre-workout food include a banana, nut-butter toast, an energy bar, and yogurt. Examples of good post-workout food include chicken with brown rice, sweet potatoes, a hard-boiled egg, and a protein bar.

To get you inspired and focused on healthy eating, here are two snacks you can try before and after your workout. Happy eating!

 

Pre-workout: Berry Smoothie

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup non-fat Vanilla Bean Greek Yogurt
  • ½ cup fresh berries of your choice
  • 1 cup ice cubes

Instructions:

Put all ingredients in a blender and pulse until smooth. Pour into a cup and enjoy!

 

Post-workout: Tuna Crackers

Ingredients:

  • 1 (7 ounce) can solid white tuna packed in water, drained
  • ¼ cup light, creamy salad dressing
  • 1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish
  • 1 box whole-grain crackers

 

Instructions:

Mash tuna, salad dressing, and relish in a bowl until combined. Serve over whole-grain crackers. Enjoy!

 

The nutritional information in this message is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding personal nutrition.